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Great Ideas for Speech and Cognitive Therapy

Katie Bille | posted May 11, 2011 | Bookmark and Share


As a speech pathologist, I am always looking for new and interesting methods to enhance therapy sessions. Over the past 31 years, I have found some unique resources to supplement the typical therapy workbooks and photo cards.

My goal is to help patients achieve success in their therapy programs, and I think that keeping things fun and fresh is a great way to do that. So, take a look at the tips provided, and remember to have fun and learn along with your patients!


Get thrifty! Visit thrift shops in your area and look for trivia games and outburst question-type games. The vocabulary and memory games are fun and interesting to my SNF residents. I usually don’t use the game boards, just the cards. When the session is over, I just put rubber bands around them and store in a clear container.  

 Be a bookworm. Books at thrift shops or your local library are useful for pictures of people, places and things. Patients can read short paragraphs for comprehension, processing and short-term memory tasks. The Eyewitness Series in the children’s section of your library is great for cognitive recall activities. Books on crafts are helpful for sequencing and memory. Biographies are also fun for long-term memory skills.

Sing along. Music books with songs from the 1940’s to the present are also useful for memory and breathing support activities. Books of poems or short stories on CD/tape can increase auditory memory. Another useful book is one that shows states and cities where your patient has lived and worked because it can remind them of past experiences they enjoyed.

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